Article Correctness Is Author's Responsibility: Delivering problem-solving treatment in low-vision rehabilitation: A pilot feasibility study.

Purpose: To explore the feasibility and preliminary effectiveness of Problem-Solving Treatment for Primary Care (PST-PC) delivered by low-vision rehabilitation (LVR) practitioners to adult clients with depressive symptoms. Design/Method: A single-group pre/postintervention study. Eighteen adult LVR clients with depressive symptoms (Patient Health Questionnaire–9 [PHQ-9] score of ≥5) received 6–8 weekly telephone sessions of PST-PC delivered by expertly trained practitioners (n = 14). Feasibility was determined via participating client and practitioner recruitment and intervention retention rates. Depressive symptoms (PHQ-9), health-related quality of life (HRQoL; Assessment of QoL Instrument–7D), and confidence in one’s ability to cope using problem-solving strategies (Coping Self-Efficacy Scale) were assessed using pre/posttelephone assessments. Results: Participating client recruitment and retention rates were 71% and 40%, respectively. Seventy percent of practitioners completed supervised training in PST-PC and demonstrated satisfactory levels of fidelity and competency. Postintervention, we observed a 53% improvement in depressive symptoms (p

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Article Correctness Is Author's Responsibility: Trajectories in postoperative recovery of elderly hip-fracture patients at risk for depression: A follow-up study.

Objectives: This secondary-analysis study aimed to identify distinct developmental depressive-symptom trajectories among elderly hip-fracture patients at risk for depression, examine the associations of trajectories with potential risk factors and care…

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Article Correctness Is Author's Responsibility: A case-control study assessing parenting sense of competence in people with multiple sclerosis.

Objective: To assess the parenting sense of competence in mothers and fathers with MS compared to a matched group of healthy parents and to evaluate whether illness features, mood, coping and social support influence parenting sense of competence in mothers and fathers with MS. Method/Design: Participants in both groups were parents with at least 1 child under 18 years of age. They completed an anonymous online questionnaire of scales on parenting sense of competence, health-related quality of life, coping, depression and anxiety, and perceived social support. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to evaluate associations between parents with MS and study outcomes. Results: Eighty parents with MS and 80 healthy parents participated in the study. The mean age of the MS group was 41.5 years and 42.8 years in the control group. Both groups were 83.8% female and 16.7% male. A comparison between groups on parenting sense of competence did not highlight a significant difference. Higher scores on the 12-Item Short Form Health Survey, both physical (p p = .001) components, contributed to a higher score on the Parenting Sense of Competence scale in the MS group. Conclusions/Implications: Parents with MS in the current study maintained a sense of competence in their parenting role, similar to the healthy control group and quality of life correlated with parenting sense of competence. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2018 APA, all rights reserved)

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Article Correctness Is Author's Responsibility: Appraisals of DisAbility Primary and Secondary Scale—Short Form (ADAPSS?sf): Psychometrics and association with mental health among U.S. military veterans with spinal cord injury.

Objective: Cognitive appraisals, that is, interpretations of what is observed and the personal relevance attributed to those observations, affect one’s behavior and well-being. Despite the centrality of appraisals in the transactional model of stress a…

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Article Correctness Is Author's Responsibility: Demographic, psychosocial, and health- and disability-related factors associated with psychological distress among people with physical disabilities.

Objectives: Psychological distress among people with physical disabilities (PWPD) might affect their physical morbidity, reduce their quality and duration of life, and increase their need for health care services. Therefore, it is essential to explore …

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