Article Correctness Is Author's Responsibility: “A meta-analytic review of the relationship between epistemic cognition and academic achievement”: Correction to Greene et al. (2018).

Reports an error in “A meta-analytic review of the relationship between epistemic cognition and academic achievement” by Jeffrey A. Greene, Brian M. Cartiff and Rebekah F. Duke (Journal of Educational Psychology, Advanced Online Publication, Mar 08, 2018, np). In the article, Table 7 contained a production-related error. Overall N was listed as “1,9,319” when it should be “159,319.” All versions of this article have been corrected. (The following abstract of the original article appeared in record 2018-09738-001.) Epistemic cognition, defined as the ways that people acquire, justify, and use knowledge, has been a prominent area of scholarship in educational psychology for nearly 50 years. Researchers have argued that epistemic cognition is a key predictor of many 21st century learning outcomes including critical thinking, scientific literacy, and historical thinking, among others. Despite a large volume of quantitative empirical research on epistemic cognition and academic achievement, there has been no published systematic analysis of this literature. We conducted a meta-analysis of 132 nonexperimental studies in this literature, and found epistemic cognition, as measured predominantly in terms of beliefs, was positively correlated with academic achievement, r = .162, p

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Article Correctness Is Author's Responsibility: Enhancing physics learning with cognitively activating instruction: A quasi-experimental classroom intervention study.

Physics educators today face two major challenges: supporting the acquisition of a solid base of conceptual knowledge and reducing the persisting gender gap. In the present quasi-experimental study, we investigated the potential of physics instruction that is enriched with evidence-based cognitively activating methods, such as inventing with contrasting cases or metacognitive questions, to overcome both of these challenges. Four physics teachers in charge of two parallel classes each applied our cognitively activating instruction in one of their classes (CogAct classes). The other classes received regular physics lessons (regular classes) on the same content. The sample consisted of 172 individuals from the advanced track of Swiss secondary school. Controlling for several individual student variables, CogAct classes (N = 87) outperformed regular classes (N = 85) in conceptual understanding at posttest (p75) particularly benefited from CogAct instruction, as indicated by descriptive statistics and the interaction between intelligence and condition in the group of the female students for posttest conceptual understanding (p

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Article Correctness Is Author's Responsibility: A meta-analytic review of the relationship between epistemic cognition and academic achievement.

[Correction Notice: An Erratum for this article was reported online in Journal of Educational Psychology on Sep 3 2018 (see record 2018-43394-001). In the article, there is an error in Table 7 which contained a production-related error. Overall N was listed as “1,9,319” when it should be “159,319.” All versions of this article have been corrected. Please see erratum for full description.] Epistemic cognition, defined as the ways that people acquire, justify, and use knowledge, has been a prominent area of scholarship in educational psychology for nearly 50 years. Researchers have argued that epistemic cognition is a key predictor of many 21st century learning outcomes including critical thinking, scientific literacy, and historical thinking, among others. Despite a large volume of quantitative empirical research on epistemic cognition and academic achievement, there has been no published systematic analysis of this literature. We conducted a meta-analysis of 132 nonexperimental studies in this literature, and found epistemic cognition, as measured predominantly in terms of beliefs, was positively correlated with academic achievement, r = .162, p

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Article Correctness Is Author's Responsibility: Teacher knowledge experiment: Testing mechanisms underlying the formation of preservice elementary school teachers’ pedagogical content knowledge concerning fractions and fractional arithmetic.

Pedagogical content knowledge forms the core of teachers’ professional knowledge; it refers to knowledge about making subject matter accessible to students. Thus, the formation of pedagogical content knowledge constitutes a crucial issue for educationa…

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Article Correctness Is Author's Responsibility: The effect of syllable-level hyphenation on reading comprehension: Evidence from eye movements.

Syllabification by hyphens (e.g., hy-phen-a-tion) is a standard procedure in early Finnish reading instruction. However, recent findings indicate that hyphenation slows down children’s reading already during the first grade (Häikiö, Hyönä, & Bertram, 2…

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Article Correctness Is Author's Responsibility: Cooperative learning in middle school: A means to improve peer relations and reduce victimization, bullying, and related outcomes.

Peer victimization is a highly stressful experience that impacts up to a third of all adolescents and can contribute to a variety of negative outcomes, including elevated anxiety, depression, drug use, and delinquency, as well as reduced self-esteem, s…

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Article Correctness Is Author's Responsibility: Social support and classroom management are related to secondary students’ general school adjustment: A multilevel structural equation model using student and teacher ratings.

Teachers’ social support and classroom management are related to secondary students’ achievement, domain-specific interest, and self-concept. However, little is known about whether social support and classroom management shape secondary students’ gener…

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Article Correctness Is Author's Responsibility: Effects of school-average achievement on individual self-concept and achievement: Unmasking phantom effects masquerading as true compositional effects.

School-average achievement is often reported to have positive effects on individual achievement (peer spillover effect). However, it is well established that school-average achievement has negative effects on academic self-concept (big-fish-little-pond…

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