Article Correctness Is Author's Responsibility: Challenge and hindrance stressors and metabolic risk factors.

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The current study investigates differential relationships between challenge and hindrance stressors and metabolic risk factors using data from the National Survey of Midlife Development in the United States (MIDUS II). Guided by the challengeâ€"hindrance stressor model and the allostatic load model, we test two theoretically driven paths: a direct physiological path and an indirect path via health behaviors (i.e., high-risk eating, cigarette smoking, and alcohol consumption). Challenge stressors versus hindrance stressors were hypothesized to differentially predict health behaviors and metabolic risk factors. Results favor the health behavior-mediated pathway in comparison with the direct physiological pathway. High-risk food consumption served as a link between hindrance stressors and metabolic risk factors. Some evidence supported smoking as a link between hindrance stressors and metabolic risk factors, and alcohol consumption as a link between challenge stressors and metabolic risk factors. The pattern of findings supported the challengeâ€"hindrance distinction, particularly in relation to health behaviors. By combining the challengeâ€"hindrance and allostatic load literatures, our study theoretically and empirically extends knowledge of how work stressors relate to physiological outcomes. Moreover, we also extend the nomological network of challenge and hindrance stressors to behavioral and physiological outcomes. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2019 APA, all rights reserved)