Article Correctness Is Author's Responsibility: “We are the ‘human family’: Multicultural experiences predict less prejudice and greater concern for human rights through identification with humanity”: Correction to Sparkman & Eidelman.

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Reports an error in "We are the "human family”: Multicultural experiences predict less prejudice and greater concern for human rights through identification with humanity" by David J. Sparkman and Scott Eidelman (Social Psychology, 2018, Vol 49[3], 135-153). The article has been published by error in two different versions. The correct version has the online publication date June 11, 2018. The difference between the two versions lies in the order of Figures 5, 6, and 7. The correct and incorrect orders of the figures are shown below. A new affiliation of the corresponding author is provided in the erratum. (The following abstract of the original article appeared in record 2018-29697-002.) This research investigated whether multicultural experiences impact identification with humanity within a broader prejudice-reduction framework. Results suggest two components of multicultural experiences – experiences with cultural elements and contact with cultural members – were negatively associated with ethnic (Study 1) and immigrant prejudice (Studies 2 and 3) through stronger identification with humanity. When controlling for their overlapping variance, overall findings suggest experiences with cultural elements and contact with cultural members both uniquely predicted less prejudice through identification with humanity. In Study 3, frequent, positive intercultural contact predicted less prejudice and greater concern for human rights through identification with humanity. Meta-analytic evidence suggests the negative association between experiences with cultural elements and prejudice (r = ?.30) was stronger than for contact (r = ?.20). (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2018 APA, all rights reserved)