Article Correctness Is Author's Responsibility: Can predictors of trait social anxiety also predict state social anxiety? Integrating personality and cultural variables of social anxiety in Asian Americans.

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Considering the potential recall bias in global (trait) measures of social anxiety, this study of Asian Americans examined whether previous findings on trait social anxiety, as assessed by a global measure, could be replicated and extended to state social anxiety, as assessed by real-time experience sampling. Specifically, we examined whether the pattern of predictions by personality and cultural variables in an integrated model could be replicated and extended to social anxiety, and whether the usefulness of the five-factor theory of personality system as an integrated model could be also replicated and extended to state social anxiety. For the replication study, 204 participants completed global measures on social anxiety, the Big-Five personality traits, acculturation, enculturation, and bicultural identity integration (BII). For the extension study, 66 participants completed a mobile survey (5 random signals a day for 21 days via smartphone), and 3,895 valid momentary reports were used for data analysis. Path analysis showed that the integrated approach was still useful, and that predictions by personality and cultural variables for trait social anxiety were also consistent with the previous findings: BII-Conflict (a subscale of BII), Neuroticism, and Extraversion provided strong predictions. Overall, the pattern of predictions by personality and cultural variables was similar for trait and state social anxiety, except for Extraversion. Though Extraversion was the strongest predictor of trait social anxiety, its prediction did not extend to state social anxiety. Potential trait-state differences in measuring social anxiety in Asian Americans were further discussed. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2019 APA, all rights reserved)