Article Correctness Is Author's Responsibility: More or less: Newlyweds’ preferred and received social support, affect, and relationship satisfaction.

The article below may contain offensive and/or incorrect content.

Matching theories of social support suggest that receiving the amount and type of support one prefers from one's romantic partner promotes more favorable affect and higher relationship satisfaction. Individuals who feel they are provided with less support from their partner than they desire (underprovision) generally experience less positive affect, more negative affect, and tend to be less satisfied in their relationships. However, research findings are mixed with regard to whether receiving more of a particular type of support from one's partner than one desires (overprovision) is associated with more favorable affect and higher relationship satisfaction. The purpose of the present study was to examine whether underprovision and overprovision of two theoretically important types of social support from spouses—emotional or informational support—were associated with more favorable affect and higher relationship satisfaction in a sample of newlywed couples. Participants were 114 newlywed couples. Data were analyzed using Actor-Partner Interdependence Moderation Models. Results suggested that receiving more emotional support was associated with more favorable affect and higher relationship satisfaction regardless of support preferences. Also, wives who received more informational support from their husbands had higher relationship satisfaction regardless of support preferences. In contrast to findings for relationship satisfaction, the association between informational support and affect were consistent with matching hypotheses. Husbands who experienced underprovision of informational support from their wives, experienced less favorable affect. In contrast, wives who experienced overprovision of informational support from their husbands experienced higher depressive symptoms. Implications for research, theory, and practice are discussed. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2018 APA, all rights reserved)